Detoxing Ion Foot Baths For Better Health!

By , March 29, 2014 1:29 pm

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Technology has played a role in our health. We are surrounded by wireless phones and computers and while they play a tremendous role in increased productivity, they also create an imbalance in positive and negative ions in your bodies system. When you sit in front of a computer all day you are bombarded with positive ions coming at you from your monitor and wireless phones anywhere in your vicinity. This makes you feel tired and sluggish and you can lose some of your concentr…

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Technology has played a role in our health. We are surrounded by wireless phones and computers and while they play a tremendous role in increased productivity, they also create an imbalance in positive and negative ions in your bodies system. When you sit in front of a computer all day you are bombarded with positive ions coming at you from your monitor and wireless phones anywhere in your vicinity. This makes you feel tired and sluggish and you can lose some of your concentration. It can be difficult to sit there for long periods of time. To undo this phenomenon, you need a boost of negative ions to put you back in balance

Have you noticed that when you are in the mountains near trees and a waterfall, or paddling down a river or just walking on the beach with the water lapping around your feet how much better you feel? This is because you are bombarded with an abundance of negative ions. This gives you that comfortable peaceful feeling we all seem to crave these days. No wonder people flock to these crisp clean air destinations to get some much needed down time.

Being that most of us are bound most of the year to our jobs and home, we tend not to experience enough of natures natural balance. And to make things worse, we are living in an environment that is far more toxic today than our fore fathers. Everything we eat, drink and breathe is more toxic than it was even 20 years ago.

An ionic foot bath is a great way to restore that feeling of well being and detox at the same time.

It works by filling a plastic tub of clean water, add sea salt, which is high in minerals, place the array and your feet in the water and the array will put out positive and negative ions. This travels through your body attaching itself like a magnet to oppositely charged toxins and mucus and excretes it through the pores in your feet. If you’ve never seen the results of a foot bath then you will be amazed at what you see. What started out as clean water will become very dirty indeed. The color of the water determines what area of the body is detoxing.

How to read your water:

Black or brown water is the liver.
Orange; means the joints.
Dark green; the gallbladder
Yellowy green; kidneys, urinary tract,
White foam; Lymph nodes draining
Red flecks; blood clot material
Black flecks; heavy metals

With the liver and kidneys taking a heavy load of toxins it is not unusual to see a lot of people with brown and black water for several foot baths. But don’t be surprised one day if you develop a urinary tract infection and your water turns green. People with arthritis will often have orangey water.

If you leave the array in the water for the allotted time you will see some color change because it will react with the minerals in the water, but placing your feet in the water changes the consistency and you will have mucus, foam and or flecks in the water, sometimes so heavy that you cannot even see your feet. Just the array in the water may be colored, but will remain clear.

Some of the benefits of ion footbaths are;

1) An enhanced the immune system
2) Assists in recovery time from injuries and surgery
3) Can relieve pain and joint stiffness due to arthritis
4) Improves sleep pattern
5) Remove heavy metals
6) Removes blood clot material
7) Improve liver and kidney function
8) Increase your energy

Detoxing is a normal function of the body but when it gets overwhelmed and pain or disease sets in, then we must do what we can to help the body unburden itself and ion foot baths help you do that.

Anything you can do to relieve your body of toxic build up will be beneficial to your health.

I hope this helps!

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Different Types Of Pain Relief Medicines

By , March 26, 2014 2:42 pm

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There are thousands of different types of pain, and for each one there are numerous different medicines that can alleviate pain symptoms. The correct medicines for each pain are appropriate to the type of pain, area, age, and condition of the individual. Some pain medicines need to be avoided by people with allergies, while some will be ineffective for some people. Pain medicines are available with or without a prescription, and include both natural and manufactured remedies….

There are thousands of different types of pain, and for each one there are numerous different medicines that can alleviate pain symptoms. The correct medicines for each pain are appropriate to the type of pain, area, age, and condition of the individual. Some pain medicines need to be avoided by people with allergies, while some will be ineffective for some people. Pain medicines are available with or without a prescription, and include both natural and manufactured remedies.

Manufactured pain relief medicines are those which are developed and produced in laboratories by scientists who have studied the reactions of receptors within the body and the chemical effects of different substances on these reactions. Some medicines that have been developed for the relief of severe pain include morphine. Morphine is a good example of a pain relief medicine that is manufactured but has been based on natural products. It is the active agent in opium, and its numbing effects are increased by concentrating it and its effect on the central nervous system. Because of its effect on this system in our bodies, morphine has numerous side effects, and can also be highly addictive.

There are many examples of pain relief medicines that are available for less severe pain, such as headaches, sinus relief, minor joint and muscle relief, and the alleviation of flu symptoms. Advil, Tylenol, Ibuprofen, Robaxacet and Neo Citron are all products developed to target specific problems within the human body. Most pain relief for headaches and other ailments contain the same active ingredients, however, and the main difference is in the strength of each type and the price and presentation of each brand. These brands commonly market their products in several strengths, including ones that are developed specifically for children. Whenever using one of these medicines, it is essential to follow the instructions provided on the label in order to avoid detrimental effects.

More and more people are beginning to opt for natural pain relief remedies as distrust of the companies who manufacture medicines continues to grow. Herbal and other natural remedies can certainly prove beneficial in many cases, however for chronic pain it is important to contact a physician, and no herbal remedies should be used until the full range of side effects is known and the patient is aware of any allergies they may have. Bee venom, for example, is known to alleviate many types of pain, including the pain brought on by arthritis, but bee venom can also be highly toxic, especially to patients allergic to it. It is best to go see a doctor, even when you are considering using a natural pain relief medicine.

No matter what type of pain you are in, the odds are that there is a medicine that has been developed to relieve it. Never overestimate your own powers of prognostication when it comes to serious pain. Even in the case of some common pain relievers, side effects can occur. It is always best to double checked with a trained practitioner.

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Curing Foot Arch Pain

By , March 23, 2014 3:38 pm

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Are you one of those people who are said to be flat footed? Having a flat foot is a condition where the foot does not have a normal arch. You may find it affects just one or both feet. The arch is the gap between the inner side of the foot and the ground when standing up. There are many people who have very low arches and some who have no arches and are termed flat-footed.

There are various symptoms associated with the condition, with the number dependent on the severity o…

Are you one of those people who are said to be flat footed? Having a flat foot is a condition where the foot does not have a normal arch. You may find it affects just one or both feet. The arch is the gap between the inner side of the foot and the ground when standing up. There are many people who have very low arches and some who have no arches and are termed flat-footed.

There are various symptoms associated with the condition, with the number dependent on the severity of the condition. Some sufferers develop corns and hard skin under the sole of their feet and the arch area can also become tender. Most flat-footed individuals tend go through shoes pretty quickly. In extreme cases some patients may experience calf, knee, hip and back pains.

What causes flat feet?

Flat-footedness may be hereditary so check your family history. It may also be the result of abnormal walking conditions caused by incorrect development of the foot.

A ruptured tendon may also cause flat-footedness. Cerebral palsy, spina bifida and muscular dystrophy can also result in a flat foot condition. Suffering from flat feet can lead directly to arch pain.

Some ways to treat flat footedness include:

?Wearing wider size shoes
?Never self-treat secondary lesions
?Buy high quality insoles to take the pressure and pain away from the arch.

Traditionally, insoles (also called orthotics) are plastic inserts that are placed inside the shoe. The insert cups the heel as well supports the arch, but since they aren’t flexible they don’t extend along the full length of the foot. These types of insoles are uncomfortable and ineffective for most flat-footed persons.

Although, older style insoles forced the arch into its correct position they didn’t relieve the pressure that was forcing the arch to collapse. This is the reason why new and better flexible insoles were created. Theses new breed of insoles are incredibly supportive and provide a stable treatment for flat-footed patients. But before buying insoles it would be best to consult your doctor to discuss what type of insoles are right for your unique situation.

What is arch pain?

Arch pain refers to inflammation or a burning sensation right in the arch area of the foot. The plantar fascia, a broad band of fibrous tissue found at the bottom of the foot may become inflamed leading to arch pain.

The treatments for arch pain include avoiding high-heeled shoes, and trying some high quality insoles to remove pressure (and pain) from the arch.

An best insole for arch pain is one that offers foot support and helps correct posture and body mechanics. These types of soles are intended to prevent foot strain and injury. It also keeps feet from rolling inward, which can result in the entire lower body being out of alignment. Moreover, these types of soles cure the underlying cause of arch pain and help to restore the natural arch of the foot.

If you think you have any of the foot problems discussed here, consult your own doctor for the treatments that will be best for your unique situation.

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Eye Surgery Providers – TLC Laser Eye Center

By , March 20, 2014 4:44 pm

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TLC Laser Eye Centers is a premier provider of LASIK and other refractive surgery procedures. The group boasts highly experienced doctors, thorough pre-operative examinations, and personalized care for each of its patients.

lasik, laser eye surgery, eye surgery, lasek, eye, vision

TLC Laser Eye Centers is a premier provider of LASIK and other refractive surgery procedures. The group boasts highly experienced doctors, thorough pre-operative examinations, and personalized care for each of its patients. It also has over 13,000 affiliated eyecare practitioners. TLC Laser Eye Centers does not offer quick assessments or overblown promises. Instead, it provides a long-term commitment for future surgical enhancements.

As a token of its genuineness, TLC offers a lifetime commitment program. Patients suffering from myopia may be eligible for this offer. According to this offer, if ever a patient requires enhancement surgery in order to maintain distance vision acuity, the enhancement surgery shall be performed without charge.

LASIK is by far the most preferred refractive surgery. However, the surgical procedure can often be expensive or even unaffordable for some people. TLC Laser Eye Centers have made an immense contribution to bring this surgery option to the masses. TLC offers variety of ways to pay for LASIK, and hence have eased out the whole procedure and have managed to make the procedure affordable for every patient. To be specific, TLC offers financing options, medical and vision plans, and flexible spending options for its patients.

The TLC Laser Eye Centers website also provides a whole repertoire of features. It might be the case that you are uncertain as to whether you should go for LASIK or not. TLC website provides a feature where you can easily check whether you are a potential LASIK candidate or not. You can locate a TLC LASIK center in your vicinity and also find a TLC affiliated eye surgeon. The website also provides a detailed description of the LASIK procedure so as to dispel any doubts that you might have had regarding LASIK.

In summary, TLC Laser Eye Centers offers scads of information and support for informed decision making. LASIK is a safe and efficacious procedure, but it’s still a surgery, and any sort of advice in such a matter is always handy.

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Exploring The Many Cures For Headaches

By , March 17, 2014 5:03 pm

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Many people get headaches as a response to physical strain, cramped muscles, and pinches nerves. These muscular headaches can be brutal, and are usually reoccurring to a very persistent degree. Usually, there is some level of tightness in or soreness in the area the muscle strain is occurring, like your neck or back area.

Because your nerves in that region are all connected and ultimately lead to your head, strain in your neck, shoulders, or back can produce headaches. Usu…

headache,cures for headaches,sinus headache,migraine

Many people get headaches as a response to physical strain, cramped muscles, and pinches nerves. These muscular headaches can be brutal, and are usually reoccurring to a very persistent degree. Usually, there is some level of tightness in or soreness in the area the muscle strain is occurring, like your neck or back area.

Because your nerves in that region are all connected and ultimately lead to your head, strain in your neck, shoulders, or back can produce headaches. Usually these kinds of headaches start out very localized, but can often spread over your entire head. Cures for headaches of this kind are difficult, as you have to cease doing whatever it is that is causing the strain, and may need extensive physical therapy to help your muscles recover.

Then there are sinus headaches. These are especially nasty, but fortunately are rarely a constant reoccurring phenomenon. Sinus headaches result from pressure in your sinuses, as a result from allergies, colds, or a sinus infection. If you get sinus headaches a lot, you may be suffering from allergies. Cures for headaches of this type can range from allergy treatments, to decongestants. My favorite is Claritin.

Unfortunately, headaches are one of the most complicated and poorly understood phenomenons in the medical world. Have you ever tried asking your doctor about cures for headaches? If you ask ten different doctors about headaches, you’ll get ten different answers.

The reason why doctors give you so many different answers is because headaches can have so many causes, and a lot of them aren’t really clear. If you get a lot of headaches, the first step you should do is try and figure out what kind of headaches you’re getting. From my understanding, there are a few different kinds.

Last but certainly not least, are migraines; everyone’s favorite and the least understood of the headache family. There are so many potential causes for migraines its not funny. If you suffer from migraines often, like me, it’s a good start to keep a kind of headache log.

Record hours you slept, how well you slept, what you ate and drank, what you did during the day, anything you can think of and see if you can detect patterns with your headaches. If you can’t get your finger on it there’s always painkillers. While they’re certainly not cures for headaches, they are better than nothing.

If you suffer from frequent headaches like me, finding some effective cures for headaches has probably been a personal goal of yours. I know for me it has been like the search for the Holy Grail. I would gladly sell my soul for some kind of magic pill of treatment that would serve as a once and for all cure for headaches.

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Determining The Cause Of Snoring

By , March 14, 2014 5:55 pm

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Many things promise to cure it, but what exactly causes it? The cause of snoring varies from one individual to another, but there are several leading factors that are believed to behind this nighttime nuisance.

Obesity is believed to be a leading cause of snoring. Many physicians, therefore, recommend a program of diet and exercise in an effort to not only prevent snoring, but also to promote better health. If you have recently been diagnosed as being either overweight or…

apnea, sleeping disorder, sleeping problems, snoring treatment

Many things promise to cure it, but what exactly causes it? The cause of snoring varies from one individual to another, but there are several leading factors that are believed to behind this nighttime nuisance.

Obesity is believed to be a leading cause of snoring. Many physicians, therefore, recommend a program of diet and exercise in an effort to not only prevent snoring, but also to promote better health. If you have recently been diagnosed as being either overweight or obese, it may be time to consider a quality program to help shed some pounds along with your snoring habit.

Another main cause of snoring is when individuals sleep on their back. When this happens, the muscles and tissue tend to relax in the back of the throat and restrict air passages. By sleeping on your side, you may help to eliminate this problem and greatly reduce snoring.

The aging process is believed to be another cause of snoring. Researchers believe that, as the skin in the throat ages, it begins to lose it’s elasticity. When this happens, it is more likely to relax and cause air passages to be restricted.

Sleep apnea is a disorder that is also a serious cause of snoring. Symptoms include excessive snoring, pauses between breathing, awakening through the night with a feeling of choking or gasping for air, etc.

The reason this occurs is because, with sleep apnea, the airways become completely blocked and the sufferer actually stops breathing on multiple occasions throughout the night. Sleep apnea, if left untreated, may often lead to more serious medical conditions. Among them, heart problems, a stroke or other serious illness.

A sleep study, which is generally ordered by a physician, may help to diagnose the direct cause of snoring for each individual. The snoring sufferer spends one night at a sleep center, which monitors his/her breathing and snoring patterns throughout the night. The results are then studied by a physician who makes a final diagnosis.

This article is intended for informational purposes only. It should not be used as, or in place of, professional medical advice. Before beginning any treatment for snoring, please consult a doctor for a proper diagnosis and remedy.

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Euthanasia and the Right to Die

By , March 11, 2014 7:31 pm

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Euthanasia, whether in a medical setting (hospital, clinic, hospice) or not (at home) is often erroneously described as “mercy killing”. Most forms of euthanasia are, indeed, motivated by (some say: misplaced) mercy. Not so others. In Greek, “eu” means both “well” and “easy” and “Thanatos” is death.

I. Definitions of Types of Euthanasia

Euthanasia, whether in a medical setting (hospital, clinic, hospice) or not (at home) is often erroneously described as “mercy killing”. Most forms of euthanasia are, indeed, motivated by (some say: misplaced) mercy. Not so others. In Greek, “eu” means both “well” and “easy” and “Thanatos” is death.

Euthanasia is the intentional premature termination of another person’s life either by direct intervention (active euthanasia) or by withholding life-prolonging measures and resources (passive euthanasia), either at the express or implied request of that person (voluntary euthanasia), or in the absence of such approval (non-voluntary euthanasia). Involuntary euthanasia – where the individual wishes to go on living – is an euphemism for murder.

To my mind, passive euthanasia is immoral. The abrupt withdrawal of medical treatment, feeding, and hydration results in a slow and (potentially) torturous death. It took Terri Schiavo 13 days to die, when her tubes were withdrawn in the last two weeks of March 2005. Since it is impossible to conclusively prove that patients in PVS (Persistent Vegetative State) do not suffer pain, it is morally wrong to subject them to such potential gratuitous suffering. Even animals should be treated better. Moreover, passive euthanasia allows us to evade personal responsibility for the patient’s death. In active euthanasia, the relationship between the act (of administering a lethal medication, for instance) and its consequences is direct and unambiguous.

As the philosopher John Finnis notes, to qualify as euthanasia, the termination of life has to be the main and intended aim of the act or omission that lead to it. If the loss of life is incidental (a side effect), the agent is still morally responsible but to describe his actions and omissions as euthanasia would be misleading. Volntariness (accepting the foreseen but unintended consequences of one’s actions and omissions) should be distinguished from intention.

Still, this sophistry obscures the main issue:

If the sanctity of life is a supreme and overriding value (“basic good”), it ought to surely preclude and proscribe all acts and omissions which may shorten it, even when the shortening of life is a mere deleterious side effect.

But this is not the case. The sanctity and value of life compete with a host of other equally potent moral demands. Even the most devout pro-life ethicist accepts that certain medical decisions – for instance, to administer strong analgesics – inevitably truncate the patient’s life. Yet, this is considered moral because the resulting euthanasia is not the main intention of the pain-relieving doctor.

Moreover, the apparent dilemma between the two values (reduce suffering or preserve life) is non-existent.

There are four possible situations. Imagine a patient writhing with insufferable pain.

1. The patient’s life is not at risk if she is not medicated with painkillers (she risks dying if she is medicated)

2. The patient’s life is not at risk either way, medicated or not

3. The patient’s life is at risk either way, medicated or not

4. The patient’s life is at risk if she is not medicated with painkillers

In all four cases, the decisions our doctor has to make are ethically clear cut. He should administer pain-alleviating drugs, except when the patient risks dying (in 1 above). The (possible) shortening of the patient’s life (which is guesswork, at best) is immaterial.

Conclusions:

It is easy to distinguish euthanasia from all other forms of termination of life. Voluntary active euthanasia is morally defensible, at least in principle (see below). Not so other types of euthanasia.

II. Who is or Should Be Subject to Euthanasia? The Problem of Dualism vs. Reductionism

With the exception of radical animal rights activists, most philosophers and laymen consider people – human beings – to be entitled to “special treatment”, to be in possession of unique rights (and commensurate obligations), and to be capable of feats unparalleled in other species.

Thus, opponents of euthanasia universally oppose the killing of “persons”. As the (pro-euthanasia) philosopher John Harris puts it:

” … concern for their welfare, respect for their wishes, respect for the intrinsic value of their lives and respect for their interests.”

Ronald Dworkin emphasizes the investments – made by nature, the person involved, and others – which euthanasia wastes. But he also draws attention to the person’s “critical interests” – the interests whose satisfaction makes life better to live. The manner of one’s own death may be such a critical interest. Hence, one should have the right to choose how one dies because the “right kind” of death (e.g., painless, quick, dignified) reflects on one’s entire life, affirms and improves it.

But who is a person? What makes us human? Many things, most of which are irrelevant to our discussion.

Broadly speaking, though, there are two schools of thought:

(i) That we are rendered human by the very event of our conception (egg meets sperm), or, at the latest, our birth; or

(ii) That we are considered human only when we act and think as conscious humans do.

The proponents of the first case (i) claim that merely possessing a human body (or the potential to come to possess such a body) is enough to qualify us as “persons”. There is no distinction between mind and abode – thought, feelings, and actions are merely manifestations of one underlying unity. The fact that some of these manifestations have yet to materialize (in the case of an embryo) or are mere potentials (in the case of a comatose patient) does not detract from our essential, incontrovertible, and indivisible humanity. We may be immature or damaged persons – but we are persons all the same (and always will be persons).

Though considered “religious” and “spiritual”, this notion is actually a form of reductionism. The mind, “soul”, and “spirit” are mere expressions of one unity, grounded in our “hardware” – in our bodies.

Those who argue the second case (ii) postulate that it is possible to have a human body which does not host a person. People in Persistent Vegetative States, for instance – or fetuses, for that matter – are human but also non-persons. This is because they do not yet – or are unable to – exercise their faculties. Personhood is complexity. When the latter ceases, so does the former. Personhood is acquired and is an extensive parameter, a total, defining state of being. One is either awake or asleep, either dead or alive, either in a state of personhood or not

The latter approach involves fine distinctions between potential, capacity, and skill. A human body (or fertilized egg) have the potential to think, write poetry, feel pain, and value life. At the right phase of somatic development, this potential becomes capacity and, once it is competently exercised – it is a skill.

Embryos and comatose people may have the potential to do and think – but, in the absence of capacities and skills, they are not full-fledged persons. Indeed, in all important respects, they are already dead.

Taken to its logical conclusion, this definition of a person also excludes newborn infants, the severely retarded, the hopelessly quadriplegic, and the catatonic. “Who is a person” becomes a matter of culturally-bound and medically-informed judgment which may be influenced by both ignorance and fashion and, thus, be arbitrary and immoral.

Imagine a computer infected by a computer virus which cannot be quarantined, deleted, or fixed. The virus disables the host and renders it “dead”. Is it still a computer? If someone broke into my house and stole it, can I file an insurance claim? If a colleague destroys it, can I sue her for the damages? The answer is yes. A computer is a computer for as long as it exists physically and a cure is bound to be found even against the most trenchant virus.

Conclusions:

The definition of personhood must rely on objective, determinate and determinable criteria. The anti-euthanasia camp relies on bodily existence as one such criterion. The pro-euthanasia faction has yet to reciprocate.

III. Euthanasia and Suicide

Self-sacrifice, avoidable martyrdom, engaging in life risking activities, refusal to prolong one’s life through medical treatment, euthanasia, overdosing, and self-destruction that is the result of coercion – are all closely related to suicide. They all involve a deliberately self-inflicted death.

But while suicide is chiefly intended to terminate a life ?the other acts are aimed at perpetuating, strengthening, and defending values or other people. Many – not only religious people – are appalled by the choice implied in suicide – of death over life. They feel that it demeans life and abnegates its meaning.

Life’s meaning – the outcome of active selection by the individual – is either external (such as “God’s plan”) or internal, the outcome of an arbitrary frame of reference, such as having a career goal. Our life is rendered meaningful only by integrating into an eternal thing, process, design, or being. Suicide makes life trivial because the act is not natural – not part of the eternal framework, the undying process, the timeless cycle of birth and death. Suicide is a break with eternity.

Henry Sidgwick said that only conscious (i.e., intelligent) beings can appreciate values and meanings. So, life is significant to conscious, intelligent, though finite, beings – because it is a part of some eternal goal, plan, process, thing, design, or being. Suicide flies in the face of Sidgwick’s dictum. It is a statement by an intelligent and conscious being about the meaninglessness of life.

If suicide is a statement, than society, in this case, is against the freedom of expression. In the case of suicide, free speech dissonantly clashes with the sanctity of a meaningful life. To rid itself of the anxiety brought on by this conflict, society cast suicide as a depraved or even criminal act and its perpetrators are much castigated.

The suicide violates not only the social contract but, many will add, covenants with God or nature. St. Thomas Aquinas wrote in the “Summa Theologiae” that – since organisms strive to survive – suicide is an unnatural act. Moreover, it adversely affects the community and violates the property rights of God, the imputed owner of one’s spirit. Christianity regards the immortal soul as a gift and, in Jewish writings, it is a deposit. Suicide amounts to the abuse or misuse of God’s possessions, temporarily lodged in a corporeal mansion.

This paternalism was propagated, centuries later, by Sir William Blackstone, the codifier of British Law. Suicide – being self-murder – is a grave felony, which the state has a right to prevent and to punish for. In certain countries this still is the case. In Israel, for instance, a soldier is considered to be “military property” and an attempted suicide is severely punished as “the corruption of an army chattel”.

Paternalism, a malignant mutation of benevolence, is about objectifying people and treating them as possessions. Even fully-informed and consenting adults are not granted full, unmitigated autonomy, freedom, and privacy. This tends to breed “victimless crimes”. The “culprits” – gamblers, homosexuals, communists, suicides, drug addicts, alcoholics, prostitutes ?are “protected from themselves” by an intrusive nanny state.

The possession of a right by a person imposes on others a corresponding obligation not to act to frustrate its exercise. Suicide is often the choice of a mentally and legally competent adult. Life is such a basic and deep set phenomenon that even the incompetents – the mentally retarded or mentally insane or minors – can fully gauge its significance and make “informed” decisions, in my view.

The paternalists claim counterfactually that no competent adult “in his right mind” will ever decide to commit suicide. They cite the cases of suicides who survived and felt very happy that they have – as a compelling reason to intervene. But we all make irreversible decisions for which, sometimes, we are sorry. It gives no one the right to interfere.

Paternalism is a slippery slope. Should the state be allowed to prevent the birth of a genetically defective child or forbid his parents to marry in the first place? Should unhealthy adults be forced to abstain from smoking, or steer clear from alcohol? Should they be coerced to exercise?

Suicide is subject to a double moral standard. People are permitted – nay, encouraged – to sacrifice their life only in certain, socially sanctioned, ways. To die on the battlefield or in defense of one’s religion is commendable. This hypocrisy reveals how power structures – the state, institutional religion, political parties, national movements – aim to monopolize the lives of citizens and adherents to do with as they see fit. Suicide threatens this monopoly. Hence the taboo.

Does one have a right to take one’s life?

The answer is: it depends. Certain cultures and societies encourage suicide. Both Japanese kamikaze and Jewish martyrs were extolled for their suicidal actions. Certain professions are knowingly life-threatening – soldiers, firemen, policemen. Certain industries – like the manufacture of armaments, cigarettes, and alcohol – boost overall mortality rates.

In general, suicide is commended when it serves social ends, enhances the cohesion of the group, upholds its values, multiplies its wealth, or defends it from external and internal threats. Social structures and human collectives – empires, countries, firms, bands, institutions – often commit suicide. This is considered to be a healthy process.

More about suicide, the meaning of life, and related considerations – HERE.

Back to our central dilemma:

Is it morally justified to commit suicide in order to avoid certain, forthcoming, unavoidable, and unrelenting torture, pain, or coma?

Is it morally justified to ask others to help you to commit suicide (for instance, if you are incapacitated)?

Imagine a society that venerates life-with-dignity by making euthanasia mandatory (Trollope’s Britannula in “The Fixed Period”) – would it then and there be morally justified to refuse to commit suicide or to help in it?

Conclusions:

Though legal in many countries, suicide is still frowned upon, except when it amounts to socially-sanctioned self-sacrifice.

Assisted suicide is both condemned and illegal in most parts of the world. This is logically inconsistent but reflects society’s fear of a “slippery slope” which may lead from assisted suicide to murder.

IV. Euthanasia and Murder

Imagine killing someone before we have ascertained her preferences as to the manner of her death and whether she wants to die at all. This constitutes murder even if, after the fact, we can prove conclusively that the victim wanted to die.

Is murder, therefore, merely the act of taking life, regardless of circumstances – or is it the nature of the interpersonal interaction that counts? If the latter, the victim’s will counts – if the former, it is irrelevant.

V. Euthanasia, the Value of Life, and the Right to Life

Few philosophers, legislators, and laymen support non-voluntary or involuntary euthanasia. These types of “mercy” killing are associated with the most heinous crimes against humanity committed by the Nazi regime on both its own people and other nations. They are and were also an integral part of every program of active eugenics.

The arguments against killing someone who hasn’t expressed a wish to die (let alone someone who has expressed a desire to go on living) revolve around the right to life. People are assumed to value their life, cherish it, and protect it. Euthanasia – especially the non-voluntary forms – amounts to depriving someone (as well as their nearest and dearest) of something they value.

The right to life – at least as far as human beings are concerned – is a rarely questioned fundamental moral principle. In Western cultures, it is assumed to be inalienable and indivisible (i.e., monolithic). Yet, it is neither. Even if we accept the axiomatic – and therefore arbitrary – source of this right, we are still faced with intractable dilemmas. All said, the right to life may be nothing more than a cultural construct, dependent on social mores, historical contexts, and exegetic systems.

Rights – whether moral or legal – impose obligations or duties on third parties towards the right-holder. One has a right AGAINST other people and thus can prescribe to them certain obligatory behaviors and proscribe certain acts or omissions. Rights and duties are two sides of the same Janus-like ethical coin.

This duality confuses people. They often erroneously identify rights with their attendant duties or obligations, with the morally decent, or even with the morally permissible. One’s rights inform other people how they MUST behave towards one – not how they SHOULD or OUGHT to act morally. Moral behavior is not dependent on the existence of a right. Obligations are.

To complicate matters further, many apparently simple and straightforward rights are amalgams of more basic moral or legal principles. To treat such rights as unities is to mistreat them.

Take the right to life. It is a compendium of no less than eight distinct rights: the right to be brought to life, the right to be born, the right to have one’s life maintained, the right not to be killed, the right to have one’s life saved, the right to save one’s life (wrongly reduced to the right to self-defence), the right to terminate one’s life, and the right to have one’s life terminated.

None of these rights is self-evident, or unambiguous, or universal, or immutable, or automatically applicable. It is safe to say, therefore, that these rights are not primary as hitherto believed – but derivative.

Go HERE to learn more about the Right to Life.

Of the eight strands comprising the right to life, we are concerned with a mere two.

The Right to Have One’s Life Maintained

This leads to a more general quandary. To what extent can one use other people’s bodies, their property, their time, their resources and to deprive them of pleasure, comfort, material possessions, income, or any other thing – in order to maintain one’s life?

Even if it were possible in reality, it is indefensible to maintain that I have a right to sustain, improve, or prolong my life at another’s expense. I cannot demand – though I can morally expect – even a trivial and minimal sacrifice from another in order to prolong my life. I have no right to do so.

Of course, the existence of an implicit, let alone explicit, contract between myself and another party would change the picture. The right to demand sacrifices commensurate with the provisions of the contract would then crystallize and create corresponding duties and obligations.

No embryo has a right to sustain its life, maintain, or prolong it at its mother’s expense. This is true regardless of how insignificant the sacrifice required of her is.

Yet, by knowingly and intentionally conceiving the embryo, the mother can be said to have signed a contract with it. The contract causes the right of the embryo to demand such sacrifices from his mother to crystallize. It also creates corresponding duties and obligations of the mother towards her embryo.

We often find ourselves in a situation where we do not have a given right against other individuals – but we do possess this very same right against society. Society owes us what no constituent-individual does.

Thus, we all have a right to sustain our lives, maintain, prolong, or even improve them at society’s expense – no matter how major and significant the resources required. Public hospitals, state pension schemes, and police forces may be needed in order to fulfill society’s obligations to prolong, maintain, and improve our lives – but fulfill them it must.

Still, each one of us can sign a contract with society – implicitly or explicitly – and abrogate this right. One can volunteer to join the army. Such an act constitutes a contract in which the individual assumes the duty or obligation to give up his or her life.

The Right not to be Killed

It is commonly agreed that every person has the right not to be killed unjustly. Admittedly, what is just and what is unjust is determined by an ethical calculus or a social contract – both constantly in flux.

Still, even if we assume an Archimedean immutable point of moral reference – does A’s right not to be killed mean that third parties are to refrain from enforcing the rights of other people against A? What if the only way to right wrongs committed by A against others – was to kill A? The moral obligation to right wrongs is about restoring the rights of the wronged.

If the continued existence of A is predicated on the repeated and continuous violation of the rights of others – and these other people object to it – then A must be killed if that is the only way to right the wrong and re-assert the rights of A’s victims.

The Right to have One’s Life Saved

There is no such right because there is no moral obligation or duty to save a life. That people believe otherwise demonstrates the muddle between the morally commendable, desirable, and decent (“ought”, “should”) and the morally obligatory, the result of other people’s rights (“must”). In some countries, the obligation to save a life is codified in the law of the land. But legal rights and obligations do not always correspond to moral rights and obligations, or give rise to them.

VI. Euthanasia and Personal Autonomy

The right to have one’s life terminated at will (euthanasia), is subject to social, ethical, and legal strictures. In some countries – such as the Netherlands – it is legal (and socially acceptable) to have one’s life terminated with the help of third parties given a sufficient deterioration in the quality of life and given the imminence of death. One has to be of sound mind and will one’s death knowingly, intentionally, repeatedly, and forcefully.

Should we have a right to die (given hopeless medical circumstances)? When our wish to end it all conflicts with society’s (admittedly, paternalistic) judgment of what is right and what is good for us and for others – what should prevail?

One the one hand, as Patrick Henry put it, “give me liberty or give me death”. A life without personal autonomy and without the freedom to make unpopular and non-conformist decisions is, arguably, not worth living at all!

As Dworkin states:

“Making someone die in a way that others approve, but he believes a horrifying contradiction of his life, is a devastating, odious form of tyranny”.

Still, even the victim’s express wishes may prove to be transient and circumstantial (due to depression, misinformation, or clouded judgment). Can we regard them as immutable and invariable? Moreover, what if the circumstances prove everyone – the victim included – wrong? What if a cure to the victim’s disease is found ten minutes after the euthanasia?

Conclusions:

Personal autonomy is an important value in conflict with other, equally important values. Hence the debate about euthanasia. The problem is intractable and insoluble. No moral calculus (itself based implicitly or explicitly on a hierarchy of values) can tell us which value overrides another and what are the true basic goods.

VII. Euthanasia and Society

It is commonly accepted that where two equally potent values clash, society steps in as an arbiter. The right to material welfare (food, shelter, basic possessions) often conflicts with the right to own private property and to benefit from it. Society strikes a fine balance by, on the one hand, taking from the rich and giving to the poor (through redistributive taxation) and, on the other hand, prohibiting and punishing theft and looting.

Euthanasia involves a few such finely-balanced values: the sanctity of life vs. personal autonomy, the welfare of the many vs. the welfare of the individual, the relief of pain vs. the prolongation and preservation of life.

Why can’t society step in as arbiter in these cases as well?

Moreover, what if a person is rendered incapable of expressing his preferences with regards to the manner and timing of his death – should society step in (through the agency of his family or through the courts or legislature) and make the decision for him?

In a variety of legal situations, parents, court-appointed guardians, custodians, and conservators act for, on behalf of, and in lieu of underage children, the physically and mentally challenged and the disabled. Why not here?

We must distinguish between four situations:

1. The patient foresaw the circumstances and provided an advance directive (living will), asking explicitly for his life to be terminated when certain conditions are met.

2. The patient did not provide an advanced directive but expressed his preference clearly before he was incapacitated. The risk here is that self-interested family members may lie.

3. The patient did not provide an advance directive and did not express his preference aloud – but the decision to terminate his life is commensurate with both his character and with other decisions he made.

4. There is no indication, however indirect, that the patient wishes or would have wished to die had he been capable of expression but the patient is no longer a “person” and, therefore, has no interests to respect, observe, and protect. Moreover, the patient is a burden to himself, to his nearest and dearest, and to society at large. Euthanasia is the right, just, and most efficient thing to do.

Conclusions:

Society can (and often does) legalize euthanasia in the first case and, subject to rigorous fact checking, in the second and third cases. To prevent economically-motivated murder disguised as euthanasia, non-voluntary and involuntary euthanasia (as set in the forth case above) should be banned outright.

VIII. Slippery Slope Arguments

Issues in the Calculus of Rights – The Hierarchy of Rights

The right to life supersedes – in Western moral and legal systems – all other rights. It overrules the right to one’s body, to comfort, to the avoidance of pain, or to ownership of property. Given such lack of equivocation, the amount of dilemmas and controversies surrounding the right to life is, therefore, surprising.

When there is a clash between equally potent rights – for instance, the conflicting rights to life of two people – we can decide among them randomly (by flipping a coin, or casting dice). Alternatively, we can add and subtract rights in a somewhat macabre arithmetic.

Thus, if the continued life of an embryo or a fetus threatens the mother’s life – that is, assuming, controversially, that both of them have an equal right to life – we can decide to kill the fetus. By adding to the mother’s right to life her right to her own body we outweigh the fetus’ right to life.

The Difference between Killing and Letting Die

Counterintuitively, there is a moral gulf between killing (taking a life) and letting die (not saving a life). The right not to be killed is undisputed. There is no right to have one’s own life saved. Where there is a right – and only where there is one – there is an obligation. Thus, while there is an obligation not to kill – there is no obligation to save a life.

Anti-euthanasia ethicists fear that allowing one kind of euthanasia – even under the strictest and explicit conditions – will open the floodgates. The value of life will be depreciated and made subordinate to considerations of economic efficacy and personal convenience. Murders, disguised as acts of euthanasia, will proliferate and none of us will be safe once we reach old age or become disabled.

Years of legally-sanctioned euthanasia in the Netherlands, parts of Australia, and a state or two in the United States (living wills have been accepted and complied with throughout the Western world for a well over a decade now) tend to fly in the face of such fears. Doctors did not regard these shifts in public opinion and legislative climate as a blanket license to kill their charges. Family members proved to be far less bloodthirsty and avaricious than feared.

Conclusions:

As long as non-voluntary and involuntary types of euthanasia are treated as felonies, it seems safe to allow patients to exercise their personal autonomy and grant them the right to die. Legalizing the institution of “advance directive” will go a long way towards regulating the field – as would a new code of medical ethics that will recognize and embrace reality: doctors, patients, and family members collude in their millions to commit numerous acts and omissions of euthanasia every day. It is their way of restoring dignity to the shattered lives and bodies of loved ones.

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Effective Ways You Can Use In Battling Candida Infection

By , March 8, 2014 8:41 pm

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Candidiasis is an infection caused by the over-growing of the fungus called Candida albicans. These fungus normally grows in the stomach but harmful if found in other parts of the body. This infection is also known as thrush or yeast infection.

Normally it is found in the human stomach as it aids in digestion. If it is found in some parts of the body, it could be a serious sign or symptom of the disease. These are the body parts where Candida albicans could be found:

1….

candida, candia diet, candida albicans, candida treatment, candida home remedy

Candidiasis is an infection caused by the over-growing of the fungus called Candida albicans. These fungus normally grows in the stomach but harmful if found in other parts of the body. This infection is also known as thrush or yeast infection.

Normally it is found in the human stomach as it aids in digestion. If it is found in some parts of the body, it could be a serious sign or symptom of the disease. These are the body parts where Candida albicans could be found:

1. In the male genitals specifically in the prepuce of the uncircumcised man.
2. In the vagina, this is called vaginitis or vaginal irritation.
3. Fold of the skin where diaper is placed, this is called diaper rash.
4. In the oral cavities, this is called oral thrush.

Yeast are normally found in the human body, but it becomes abnormal if it overgrows on a certain parts where it should not even be there. Most women experience yeast infection in their life as Candida albicans can be found on the vagina due to over productionof yeast. In pregnant mothers, the use of antibiotics and diabetes can be a cause of candida infection.

You will know if you have candida infection if you will note the following signs and symptoms. In the vagina, you will notice a whitish gray discharge. That sometimes look like cheese or smells like beer or baking soda.

To determine the presense of candia, you can use potassium hydroxide (KOH). A piece or a skin scrap of the affected area is then placed on the slide to be viewed over the microscope. A small amount of KOH is dropped over the slide, the KOH is dissolved by the skin leaving the microorganisms unharmed. You will be seeing the pores of the Candida albicans over the microscope. If it is present in huge numbers, it will suggest yeast infection.

You may then have to rub your skin with a sterile swab. It must also be rubbed over the cultured medium, which will be incubated in a few days. Colonies of yeast may develop which gives a concrete idea of the presence of the disease in the body of the tested specimen.

Home remedies can treat this infection effectively. You can use the following guidelines to be able to get rid of candida infection:

?The most effective treatment for yeast infection is acidophilus. Acidophilus comes into many forms, such as tablets, caplets, liquid, ointment form and powdered. You can take the treatment orally or topical. Acidophilus ointments are also effective in treating the infection. The duration may take two weeks for your infection to vanish completely.

?You can also use boiled guava leaves as an antiseptic wash for your infected vagina. It has antiseptic properties that effectively removes the bacteria that grow in the skin of your vagina.

?You can also use garlic together with tea tree oil, as it is also a powerful treatment for yeast infection.

This information will be a great help for you to eliminate the infection of yeast in your body. Knowledge about the disease is the most effective tool in treating the infection.

Note: This article may be freely reproduced as long as the AUTHOR’S resource box at the bottom of this article is included and and all links must be Active/Linkable with no syntax changes.

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Does Chiropractic Care Really Make Sense?

By , March 5, 2014 8:51 pm

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The Role of Chiropractic in Treatment Beyond the Resolution of Symptoms

Do you have the same nagging injury that never seems to go away? Are you suffering needlessly with pain? Are you fed up with taking painkillers? Do you want to find out what is causing your pain? If your answer is ‘yes?to any of these questions, then chiropractic may be a solution for you.

Typically, the chiropractic patient enters the office with some kind of pain. Back pain, neck pain, hip pain, …

Chiropractic,Care,Medical,Advisory,Board,Health,Back,Institute

The Role of Chiropractic in Treatment Beyond the Resolution of Symptoms

Do you have the same nagging injury that never seems to go away? Are you suffering needlessly with pain? Are you fed up with taking painkillers? Do you want to find out what is causing your pain? If your answer is ‘yes?to any of these questions, then chiropractic may be a solution for you.

Typically, the chiropractic patient enters the office with some kind of pain. Back pain, neck pain, hip pain, leg pain, arm pain, shoulder pain, etc. comes in all different shapes and sizes. However, all of these pains share one common thread, they are all symptoms. Symptoms tell you that something in your body has gone wrong. They serve as a warning system to alert you of a deeper problem. Healing occurs regardless of the symptom/s experienced. The quality of healing depends on the effectiveness of locating and addressing the cause.

Many people in today’s society experience pain due to abnormal structure of the neuromusculoskeletal system. The neuromusculoskeletal system comprises the human frame and posture. Abnormal postural structure not only predisposes the human body’s systems to abnormal function, but may ultimately result in an injury or chronic condition.

Altered alignment of the human frame may lead to poor healing and repair of the body tissues. These architectural and pathological changes may occur in muscle, ligament, bone and central/peripheral nervous system. Chiropractic aims at therapeutically restoring these pathological deformations of the neuromusculoskeletal system and spine to allow for optimum function of the human frame and nervous system.

Correct spinal mechanics and the health of the whole neuromusculoskeletal system are interdependent. Therefore, chiropractic treatment focuses on restoring proper spinal mechanics which will, in turn, influence the function of the nervous system.

Chiropractic rehabilitation enhances the healing process and assists the body in its efforts to heal itself by controlling the long-term degenerative changes in the human frame and posture. Care is based upon the human process of healing. The healing process is categorized into fairly distinct progressive stages. Consequently, conservative chiropractic rehabilitative care flows with these stages. It is not the intention of this article to provide an in-depth review of rehabilitative chiropractic care and/or the healing process; rather, the purpose is to highlight some of the pertinent concepts in understanding how one can achieve better health through chiropractic care.

Acute inflammatory stage. This initial stage of response to injury lasts up to 72 hours. The goals of care during this phase of healing are directed at reducing the reactive inflammatory response and eventual removal of debris from the tissues. Clinical management includes the use of chiropractic adjustments, ice, heat, gentle range of motion exercises, and passive stretching.

Repair stage. The repair stage lasts from 72 hr. up to 6 wk. and is characterized by the synthesis and deposition of collagen (scar formation) in an attempt to regenerate damaged tissue. During this stage the body’s main concern is the increase of the quantity of collagen to replaced damaged tissue. However, this new scar formation is not fully oriented in the right direction and is of a mechanically inferior quality. Clinical goals during this phase include freeing early adhesions and maintaining muscular tone and ligamentous integrity.

Remodeling stage. This stage lasts from 3 wk. to 12 months or more (depending on the severity of the injury), during which time the collagen scar is remodeled to increase the function of the new tissue. The rehabilitative goals primarily involve improving the quality, orientation and strength of the collagen. This is accomplished by alignment of global body positions and posture, increasing functional capacity, reducing stress/strain on involved injured structures, and management of disability.

So, when does the healing occur? It starts immediately after the injury and can last for over a year depending on the severity of the injury and the action steps taken to help the body heal efficiently. Addressing an injury as early as possible using chiropractic care can result in the best possible scenario of full recovery. Addressing your chronic injuries now results in the return of a pain free lifestyle, doing all the things you love to do.

*Troyanovich SJ, Harrison DE, Harrison DD. Structural Rehabilitation of the Spine and Posture: Rationale for Treatment Beyond the Resolution of Symptoms. JMPT 1998; 21(1): 37-50.

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Colon Cleaning- The Secret Behind Health And Vitality

By , March 2, 2014 9:59 pm

522

It does not require you to be an authority on health to know that disease begins in the colon and to be in optimum health we need the colon to be in perfect state. But most of us do not have the clear idea as to what is meant by a healthy colon. The primary function of the colon is to eliminate waste materials from our system and conserve water in the body. A healthy colon is also one which is a home to helpful bacteria that absorbs valuable nutrients into the body.

You ma…

colon,colon cleanse,colon cleansing,colon cleaning

It does not require you to be an authority on health to know that disease begins in the colon and to be in optimum health we need the colon to be in perfect state. But most of us do not have the clear idea as to what is meant by a healthy colon. The primary function of the colon is to eliminate waste materials from our system and conserve water in the body. A healthy colon is also one which is a home to helpful bacteria that absorbs valuable nutrients into the body.

You may be shocked to know, but it is an unfortunate fact that average Americans do not possess a healthy colon in the true sense of the term. It is the price they pay for living fast paced lives sustained on soft drinks and junk foods. Primarily a flawed dietary practice and other factors lead to the accumulation of toxic elements in the colon that are gradually transported to other parts of the body triggering of a variety of symptoms like constipation, diarrhea, fatigue, low energy and vitality, skin problems, foul body odor, halitosis or bad breath, colds and many more.

Then what is the solution if you are among those who suffer from one of these as a chronic disorder? Well, it is an indication that you need to detoxify and cleanse your body’s waste elimination system and remember any cleansing program starts with the colon. There are number of ways to accomplish this objective. The major colon cleansing methods include Colon Hydrotherapy, Enemas, Herbal supplements, Laxatives and Oxygen-based Cleansers.

A proper cleansing and detoxification of the system is the key to health and vitality. A clean and healthy colon ensures an overall well-being. Let me explain how.

When it is clogged with waste matters accumulated over the years due to wrong consumption of foods, first the colon and then the whole system get polluted with toxic elements. This is a process known as autointoxication or self-poisoning where body gets toxic as a result of substances produced by our own body as a result of insufficient elimination due to a blocked passage.

Everyday we come across so many people who look much older than their actual age with an air of losing all drive for living. The reason is again an unhealthy colon. In addition to so many physical disorders as described above we also lose the vitality of our mind and we feel depressed, weak, lethargic and fatigued due to this autointoxication. It occurs when the toxins accumulate in the nervous system, hearts and the glands. As a cumulative result of all these we look older than our age and appear like

Thus while the health and vitality depends on proper functioning and maintenance of the colon, the proper cleansing method ensures that our colon remains in a proper state of health and wellbeing. A periodical cleansing of our systems is as important as caring for the external cleaning of our body like bathing or brushing. And the detoxification and cleansing program starts right at your colon, which if kept unclean may contaminate your whole system.

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