Caring For Your Colon

By , July 11, 2012 11:14 am

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The instance of colon cancer is on the rise. Colon cancer, like heart disease, is considered a twentieth century disease, as it was basically unheard of before the early 1900s. Most professionals consider colon cancer to be directly related to diet.

Taking better care of your colon and thus lessen the risk of colon problems or cancer can be accomplished by changes in your diet, exercise routine and lifestyle. Of the three, diet is the most important.

Lack of fiber in th…

Colon, Colon Care, Colon Health

The instance of colon cancer is on the rise. Colon cancer, like heart disease, is considered a twentieth century disease, as it was basically unheard of before the early 1900s. Most professionals consider colon cancer to be directly related to diet.

Taking better care of your colon and thus lessen the risk of colon problems or cancer can be accomplished by changes in your diet, exercise routine and lifestyle. Of the three, diet is the most important.

Lack of fiber in the diet is the number one cause of colon difficulties. Fiber helps the colon to function properly. By simply adding more breads and legumes to your diet can help keep your colon doing its job and allow your bowels to empty regularly. Soy products and increased calcium intakes have also been linked to positive colon health.

Water is essential to all parts of the body, but especially important in forming proper stools and colon elimination. The old adage of eight glasses per day is still true today. Soy products and other calcium rich foods can also be beneficial to colon health and well being.

Exercise is vital to colon health. Regular exercise, even simple walking, helps the colon by allowing the toxins to continue to move through the body. Sedentary lifestyles contribute to colon difficulties by forcing the GI tract into cramped and stifled space.

One of the worst things you can do to your colon is waiting to pass the stools when you feel the urge ‘to go? By not allowing your body to function, as it needs to, the stool backs up in the colon and begins to decay. Holding back can also lead to either constipation or diarrhea, depending on the toxins in the stool. By promptly discharging the stools as needed, the body rids itself of the toxins and thus keeps the colon and the entire GI tract healthy.

Minimizing the risks of colon problems can reduce the risks of other debilitating illnesses such as appendicitis. Good colon health can also prevent nutritional deficiencies. Any signs of constipation or diarrhea should be taken seriously and if they persist, should be discussed with your physician immediately.

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